Friday, April 30, 2010

Chicago-themed photo exhibit by Ken Breidenbaugh extended to May 7

A current exhibit at Ohio University-Chillicothe by faculty member Ken Breidenbaugh has been extended to May 7, beyond its original end date of April 30.
“Chicago: The Loop” includes nearly 70 photos that Breidenbaugh took while on a trip to the Windy City in mid-March.
The photos offer an authentic, candid view of Chicago.
“The subjects are meant to be straight-forward arrangements of architecture, structures, colors, textures and light that I find appealing in a city whose constant visual complexities – and simplicities – are so alluring,” Breidenbaugh, assistant professor of comparative arts, art history and theater, said in his artist statement that accompanies the exhibit.
Toward that end, Breidenbaugh allows only his camera to come between the city and those viewing the photos.
“There is no Photoshoppping, cropping or other manipulation. The result is reasonably close to those first through-the-lens views,” he said.

Thursday, April 29, 2010

Taking a fun approach to conservation

To hear OU-C student Megan Stanley describe the experience in her own words, visit OU-C’s YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/ouchillicothe
Several Ohio University-Chillicothe students shared the importance of conservation and ecology during recent Earth Day-related activities at Unioto Elementary School.
“I am into recycling in a big way, and I enjoyed the opportunity to interact with elementary students,” said Megan Stanley of Waver High School, who helped students reuse products to build their own litterbugs. “Since these students will be the new society and the people to make lasting change, in regards to conservation, I think this is important.”
Kim Batty, an OU-C student from Vinton County, said, “This has been a neat experience. It gives me ideas on how to work with students and develop creative projects in my classrooms in the future. The more practical experience I get, the better prepared I am to become a teacher.”
Additionally, geography faculty member Gary Haynes and an OU-C student talked about the importance of trees to ecosystems to approximately 220 students in grades four through six. They also distributed pine tree seedlings, which were donated by F&W Forestry Services, for planting to the students.
Cutlines: OU-C student Megan Stanley works with Unioto Elementary School students to construct ‘litterbugs,’ while her classmate Kim Batty shows off the results of their efforts.

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Upcoming first-ever Academic Majors Fair helps position students for successful college careers

To help students have the best information before them in the most convenient fashion, OU-C is hosting its first-ever Academic Majors Fair from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 5 in the front hallway of Bennett Hall. “Because of its long-lasting impact on a student’s college career and professional career, the selection of an academic major is one of the most important decisions a student can make,” OU-C Academic Advisor Cristy Null said. “This event is designed to give our students all of the resources and perspectives they need to make the best decision.” Individuals from the Chillicothe and Athens campuses are invited to participate in the event. The goal is to have a wide range of academic disciplines represented, including those at OU-C and at OU-Athens. “An advantage of attending OU-C is the opportunity to relocate on the Athens campus and to have access to their academic resources and programs,” Null said. Those wishing to participate should contact Null at nullc1@ohio.edu. In addition to offering a marketplace of potential majors for those who are undeclared in this area, the event also allows students to further investigate their chosen academic pursuits. “Students will have time to take an in-depth look at their academic majors and the various options that are available to them within each academic discipline,” Null said. The Athens campus holds a similar event in the fall. OU-C chose to wait until spring quarter so that first-year students have a broader perspective before selecting a major. “Often, students are focused on making the transition to college during the first quarter or two and are not ready to focus on the outcome of their college experience,” Null explained. “At this point in the academic year, their focus often begins to turn from surviving college to making the most of the opportunity, and they are better prepared for this decision. We realize that many students feel obligated to declare an academic major before they are certain about what academic program they really want to pursue.” It is not uncommon for a student to be uncertain of an academic major. Null noted that, of the 490 students she formally advises, 290 are undeclared in terms of their academic majors. “This event is an important step in further supporting the campus’ retention and career-preparation efforts,” Director of Student Services John Fisher said. “It builds on the student-focused approach of the Advising Center in bringing together individuals from across campus and beyond in a way that best serves our students and our region by putting today’s students on the right path toward becoming proficient professionals, often in area communities.” Each participating student who receives at least four signatures from representatives on his/her “passport” will be eligible for door prizes. In addition, Hilltopper Advising Center representatives will be available to distribute DARS information and make advising appointments.

OU-C students and faculty members attend art exhibits, talks on Athens campus

OU-C ceramics students and faculty members attended Korean-born ceramist SunKoo Yuh’s recent lecture, exhibition and workshop at the Athens campus. Visiting artist SunKoo Yuh, an associate professor of art at the University of Georgia, gave an artist’s lecture in conjunction with his exhibition of ceramics and drawings at the Kennedy Museum. OU-C students Crystal Detty and Bekah Sims and professors Dennis Deane and Margaret McAdams attended the event. On Saturday, April 10, students Detty and fellow student Joan Stevens accompanied Deane and McAdams to SunKoo’s day-long workshop in the School of Art’s ceramics studios. Pam McGinnis also attended. SunKoo made an ink drawing on paper to inspire the clay piece he began and worked on throughout the day. On April 15, Detty and Lisa Moore accompanied McAdams to the New Ceramics Exhibition at the Dairy Barn in Athens. Figurative hand-built ceramics by 22 different artists were on display. They also visited SunKoo Yuh's exhibit at the Kennedy Museum. McAdams says that giving art students the opportunity to see a large body the work by an internationally acclaimed artist will leave a deep impression on them. “His exhibition, as well as the range of works by other important ceramists working with hand-building techniques, will continue to influence the work of the students who attended these events.”
Cutline: OU-C student Joan Stevens views ceramist SunKoo Yoh creating and describing his artwork.

Educational administration master’s program designed for aspiring principals

Ohio University’s Principal Preparation Program is scheduled to begin June 22 at the Chillicothe and Southern (Ironton) campuses of Ohio University. The program represents an ideal blend of on-line and in-class courses and the practical and conceptual aspects of the principalship. The Principal Preparation Program provides an opportunity for individuals, who aspire to become administrators, to obtain a master's degree in educational administration and a principal license during a 24-month period. For additional information, contact Bill Larson at larsonw@ohio.edu or 740-533-4580. Admissions requirements are available online at http://www.coe.ohiou.edu/academics/es/ea/rural-principals.htm. During the two summer sessions of the program, the students register for and complete approximately half of the courses. This approach helps to minimize the expectations of the students during the school year and reduce the overall cost of the program. Students only meet on nine occasions during the period between September and June. The master’s degree portion of the program can be completed in five quarters. Three more quarters are needed to complete the balance of the licensure coursework. The program provides its students with an opportunity to become knowledgeable in a substantive manner about the operation of a school and to hit the ground running as administrators. The Principal Preparation Program is Nationally Recognized by the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC). The program’s graduates tend to do exceptionally well on the required Praxis test, to be employed as administrators based upon the strong reputation of the program, and to do well once they become principals.

Upcoming Campus Events

• “Chicago: The Loop” photo exhibit by Ken Breidenbaugh exhibited in the Bennett Hall Scott art gallery through end of April • Academic Council meetings at noon in Bennett Hall room 105 on May 4 & 18 • Classified Group meetings at 9 a.m. on May 4 • Administrative Council meeting at 9 a.m. in Bennett Hall room 105 on May 6 • Campus ‘Spring Fling’ on May 19. Details will be forthcoming • OU-C political science faculty member Nicholas Kiersey to discuss “Debating Politics Through Science Fiction” at noon on May 27 in Bennett Hall room 105 • Recognition of Graduation event at 7:30 p.m. on June 11 in the Shoemaker Center; Nursing pinning ceremony at 2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Educational administration master’s program designed for aspiring principals

Ohio University’s Principal Preparation Program is scheduled to begin June 22 at the Chillicothe and Southern (Ironton) campuses of Ohio University. The program represents an ideal blend of on-line and in-class courses and the practical and conceptual aspects of the principalship. The Principal Preparation Program provides an opportunity for individuals, who aspire to become administrators, to obtain a master's degree in educational administration and a principal license during a 24-month period. For additional information, contact Bill Larson at larsonw@ohio.edu or 740-533-4580. Admissions requirements are available online at http://www.coe.ohiou.edu/academics/es/ea/rural-principals.htm. During the two summer sessions of the program, the students register for and complete approximately half of the courses. This approach helps to minimize the expectations of the students during the school year and reduce the overall cost of the program. Students only meet on 9 occasions during the period between September and June. The master’s degree portion of the program can be completed in five quarters. Three more quarters are needed to complete the balance of the licensure coursework. The program provides its students with an opportunity to become knowledgeable in a substantive manner about the operation of a school and to hit the ground running as administrators. The Principal Preparation Program is Nationally Recognized by the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC). The program’s graduates tend to do exceptionally well on the required Praxis test, to be employed as administrators based upon the strong reputation of the program, and to do well once they become principals.

Monday, April 26, 2010

Poetry & picnic event draws rave reviews

More than 100 students, staff, and community members enjoyed a freshly grilled hot dog picnic lunch while they listened to poetry during the Chillicothe Campus’ “Poetry & Picnic” event on April 22. OU-C faculty member and event moderator Jan Schmittauer did her usual outstanding job at encouraging the poets, who included students of OU-C and community members of all ages. Following the first hour of open poetry readings, the audience was treated to a taste of Sensory Serenade, a combination of Rick Barnes reading poetry, while John K. Victor painted, followed by original music performed by Barnes and three local musicians. All of the poems and songs were interpreted by Krista Shoults and three practicum students, which added another visual dimension to the event, as well as making the poetry available to D/deaf members of the audience. Head Librarian Allan Pollchik, organizer of the event, said, “I was hoping this event would provide a place for student and local talent to showcase their art, and I was once again amazed at the talent within our midst.”