Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Expressing appreciation for a job well done


OU-C Dean Donna Burgraff recently hosted a Faculty and Student Leadership Appreciation Reception to express her gratitude for these members of the Chillicothe Campus community who do much to help foster a true sense of a learning community on campus. Students are currently in the midst of winter quarter final exams.

Student environmental club forming on campus

The newly-formed Student Environmental Club at OU-Chillicothe will hold its second organizational meeting on Wednesday, March 16 at 2 p.m. in the Learning Commons of Stevenson Center. The agenda includes completion of the student organization registration form, approval of the club constitution and by-laws, and election of officers. Also, activities for the club during spring quarter will be discussed and some possibilities include involvement in a campus Earth Day event, field trips and a community garden.

The club’s first organizational meeting was held March 9 when sample club organizational forms were distributed. Nine students from the Chillicothe campus have expressed strong interest in forming this club and it is anticipated that more students will join as the club begins activities this spring quarter. Any student with interest should attend the March 16 meeting. Those interested but unable to attend this meeting should send a message of interest to the club advisor Gary Haynes (haynes@ohio.edu).

Campus ‘Biggest Loser’ challenge promotes healthy choices

Members of the OU-C campus community can become involved in a weighty endeavor in the campus’ Biggest Loser Weight Challenge during spring quarter. The 10-week initiative begins April 4 and highlights common-sense, healthy ways to lose weight.

A feature of the program is discretion. Participants weigh themselves in privacy and maintain a weekly log of their weight loss and exercise regimen. It costs $5 to enter, and participants receive weekly e-mail messages with motivational tips and weight-loss suggestions.

Participants will be eligible for prizes, and a special prize will be awarded to the individual who logs the most fitness activities.

The contest is open to all OU-C students, faculty and staff members. Material is available at the Health and Wellness Center desk in the Shoemaker Center or by contacting Health and Wellness Center Administrative Coordinator Kim McKimmy-Kelly at kellyk@ohio.edu

“This challenge supports the Health and Wellness Center’s emphasis on fitness and developing healthy lifestyle habits,” McKimmy-Kelly said. “This should be a fun experience as we become a healthier campus community.”

Monday, March 14, 2011

Student environmental club forming on campus

The newly-formed Student Environmental Club at OU-Chillicothe will hold its second organizational meeting on Wednesday, March 16 at 2 p.m. in the Learning Commons of Stevenson Center. The agenda includes completion of the student organization registration form, approval of the club constitution and by-laws and election of officers. Also, activities for the club during spring quarter will be discussed and some possibilities include involvement in a campus Earth Day event, field trips and a community garden.

The club’s first organizational meeting was held March 9 when sample club organizational forms were distributed. Nine students from the Chillicothe campus have expressed strong interest in forming this club and it is anticipated that more students will join as the club begins activities this spring quarter. Any student with interest should attend the March 16 meeting. Those interested but unable to attend this meeting should send a message of interest to the club advisor Gary Haynes (haynes@ohio.edu).

Programs allow high school students to get jump on college career while enrolled in high school

See and hear current participant Chloe Bowman discuss her experience in the Seniors to Sophomores program on the campus’ YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/ouchillicothe

Ohio University-Chillicothe is involved in several programs and partnerships that allow area students to gain college credit and experience while they are still enrolled in high school.

“These programs provide opportunities for area students to begin their college careers before they graduate from high school. There are several options that appeal to a range of students, depending on their interests. Not only do they introduce students to the college experience, but they provide substantial cost-savings to students and their parents by allowing them to gain college credit for no cost,” OU-C Manager of Student Recruitment and Admissions TJ Eveland said.

The options include:

POST-SECONDARY OPTIONS
Approximately 45 students are enrolled in this state-funded program, which allows students to take college courses on a part-time basis. The goal is to augment, rather than replace, the high school experience. The students take the courses on campus and get a feel for the college experience with little disruption to their normal high school routine.

SENIORS TO SOPHOMORES
This program allows for high school students to get an early jump on their college careers by taking classes on the OU-C campus. They spend their senior year taking classes on the Chillicothe Campus and earning credit that counts toward both high school graduation and college credit.

The participating students will earn approximately 45 college credits during the academic year, which translates to approximately a full college academic year’s worth of credits. This allows for many students and their parents to save significant costs. They students can also remain engaged in high school activities as their schedules allow.

This year, 12 Ross County high school students are involved in this program.

By participating in these programs, the Chillicothe Campus is putting into action its mission of serving as a gateway to higher education for individuals of the region.

“By helping to offer these opportunities to high school students we are fulfilling the campus’ mission of making higher education accessible to area residents,” Eveland said. “Students who are interested should contact their high school guidance counselors for more information. Or, any all area residents who are interested in pursuing a college education, whether at OU-C or elsewhere, can contact me, and I would be glad to speak with them.”

Several students who have been enrolled in these programs while in high school have continued their college careers on the Chillicothe Campus.

The benefits of the programs differ as much as the students’ interests, backgrounds and future plans.

“I had been homeschooled my sophomore and junior year and only had a couple more credits needed to graduate but still had my senior year to complete. I found out about this program and I was very interested in getting college credit my senior year. I was able to get in through the test (which was challenging) and have loved this year at OU-C,” said Chloe Bowman a Seniors to Sophomores participant.

Bowman, who took high school courses by the online Virtual Online Learning Academy through Zane Trace High School, sees the advantages of blending her final year of high school and first year of college.

“There are so many benefits to this program; for one, getting over 45 credit hours for free plus books,” she said. “Plus, I have had the experience of meeting so many new people and receiving diverse insight by many diverse professors and the ability to take advantage of getting through college faster. The first quarter for me was a breeze. I really enjoyed only going to school two days a week and my classes were fairly easy. Once I started my second quarter things got a little more difficult. I had a lot going on that added to my school load, but overall it was still a great experience. But everything has been worth the effort and time.”

Bowman plans to pursue a career as a dental hygienist and probably pursue an associate degree at Shawnee State University.

“I decided to do this program because I wanted to take advantage of an early start with college and my career,” said Brandee Uhrig, a Seniors to Sophomores student from Huntington High School. “The program has really been beneficial to me because I have been given greater responsibilities as well as higher education. I challenged myself by taking 17 to 19 credit hours per quarter but it has been worth it and I was able to make the Dean's List.”

She plans to attend Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Mich., and major in pre-physical therapy, then later pursue a doctorate in physical therapy.

“During my sophomore year in high school I was first introduced to the program and quickly realized that it was a great opportunity. After much research and thought I found out that I could meet my graduation requirements for high school while also earning college credit,” said Tyler McMahan, a Post-Secondary Option (PSEO) student from Western High School in Latham. “I learned that this could reduce my college time after high school graduation. Then on top of that, the program was at no cost to me. After reviewing these benefits, I decided to participate in the program.”

“The benefits of the program are obvious. Students are able to meeting high school graduation requirements, while also gaining college credit at no cost. I also think the program allows students to gain a better understanding of the ‘college system,’ which helps when planning for college after the program,” McMahan said. “The biggest challenge I have faced is the load of college coursework. I have found college classes to be much harder than high school courses and that they require more studying.”

He plans to attend Wright State University and major in mechanical engineering.

For more information, Eveland can be reached at (740) 774-7721 or evelandt@ohio.edu.

Here Eveland discuss these programs that allow high school students to begin their college careers on WBEX Radio's 'Sounding Board' podcast at http://www.wbex.com/pages/podcasts.html