Friday, February 13, 2015

Chillicothe Campus students describe traits of their favorite faculty members

Colin Echard, Mackenzie Brodess, Katy Landrum

Mackenzie Boyer

Nicholas Kennedy

We regularly talk with Chillicothe Campus students to get their take on the campus experience. We recently asked students to describe the traits of a truly cool faculty member.

Colin Echard, an anatomy major from Zane Trace High School, cited an example. “Dr. Hammoudi is the man. He is incredibly passionate about his job and very thorough about his explanations.”

Professor Hammoudi’s popularity is growing. “A good faculty member is extremely good at explaining things that do not make sense. As with Dr. Hammoudi, he is super good to everyone. Another trait of any cool faculty members is that they are willing to talk with students during their office hours,” said Katy Landrum, a post-secondary option student who attends Jackson High School.

“Tony Vinci is a faculty member I really like,’ said Mackenzie Brodess, a pre-dentistry student from Zane Trace High. “He is energetic and makes a good learning environment. He encourages students to express themselves.”

“Mike Lafreniere is really interested in his students and wants them to succeed,” said Mackenzie Boyer, a Chillicothe High graduate who is undeclared in terms of her academic major. “Also, I really like Debra Nickles. She really wants her students to learn and gives good feedback.”

Nicholas Kennedy, an environmental engineering technology student from Chillicothe High, said, “I like all of my EVT professors. Jamie Mash is especially good. He explains careers we can go into, and they are all very motivated.”

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Charles McKinney delivers thought-provoking talk as Kennedy Lecture Series, Black History Month speaker


Charles McKinney, Jr., Ph.D., spoke on “Seeing the Unseen: Grappling with Race, History and the Fierce Urgency of Now” during a recent talk on the Chillicothe Campus. He served as this year’s Kennedy Lecture Series speaker, and his talk also commemorated Black History Month.

He discussed race relations in a historical perspective, touching on topics such as the founding of the United States, the civil rights movement, segregation by law and cultural norms, as well as the post-civil rights period.

“Our nation’s racial heritage is woven into the fabric of American life,” he said.

McKinney noted recent events, citing unwarranted killings and the inability to bring people to justice.

“Many things we have seen as a nation bother us greatly,” he said. “We have tried to make sense of what we have seen … some see things otherwise … and others do not see anything at all,” McKinney said.

Professor McKinney encouraged audience members to analyze their sources of information and to try to understand why others have different perspectives.

“The object of the game is not necessarily to get you to agree with me” … but to understand the various routes that lead others to come to different conclusions, he said.

Professor McKinney is the Neville Frierson Bryan Chair of Africana Studies and Associate Professor of History at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tenn. He is author of Greater Freedom: The Evolution of the Civil Rights Struggle in Wilson, North Carolina. McKinney has spoken and written widely, particularly on the development of the civil rights movement in rural North Carolina. He has appeared on CNN as well as published an op-ed piece in USA Today.

McKinnney teaches a variety of courses that focus on the African-American experience in the United States. He notes that he has long been fascinated by the under-researched phenomenon of mass-based protest and community struggle that occur in places far removed from the urban centers of the South.

McKinney earned his bachelor’s degree from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga., and both his master’s and doctoral degree from Duke University.

The Kennedy Lecture Series strives to bring esteemed speakers to campus to share their perspectives and insights. The lecture series supports the campus’ emphasis on providing area residents with activities that add to the richness and vibrancy of the campus and local community. 

Hilltopper basketball teams enter tournament action

By student public relations writer Megan Valentine
The men’s and women’s Hilltopper basketball teams recently concluded their regular season schedules, and both will now make appearances in the 49th Ohio Regional Campus State Basketball Tournament.

The Lady Hilltoppers finished with a record of 8-4 in the conference. Jenny Grigsby leads the team as top scorer with 21.2 points per game.

In the first round of the ORC Tournament the women’s team will travel to Miami Middletown to take on Ohio University-Zanesville. The game will begin at 3 p.m. this Saturday, Feb. 14.

If OU-C is victorious in this matchup, the women’s team will then face off against No. 3 seed Miami Middletown at 5 p.m. on Sunday. The winner of this game will move on to the Final Four at Ohio University-Lancaster the following weekend.

Ohio University-Chillicothe’s men’s Hilltopper basketball team finished 8-6 in the conference this season. Top scorer Noah Godsey leads the team with 22.5 points per game.

The men will travel to Miami Hamilton for their first round of the ORC Tournament this weekend. At 5 p.m. on Saturday they will face Miami Hamilton, and the winner will then take on No. 3 seed Miami Middletown at 5 p.m. on Sunday for the opportunity to continue in the tournament.

The men’s Final Four will tip off at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21 at Ohio University-Lancaster, and the Ohio Regional Campus Conference Championship game will take place on Sunday, Feb. 22 at 3:30 p.m.

Jim Hagan to discuss Seasonal Affective Disorder


Dr. Jim Hagen will discuss Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), including its symptoms and how to address the malady, during a discussion at 2 p.m. on Feb. 19 in Bennett Hall room 110 at Ohio University-Chillicothe.

The discussion, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Campus Health, Wellness and Safety Committee.

SAD is a mood disorder in which individuals have normal mental health during most of the year but experience depressive symptoms during specific seasons. It also is known as winter depression or the winter blues. Individuals sometimes suffer from symptoms of depression, such as fatigue, lack of interest, social withdrawal, craving certain foods and weight gain.

Reminder: Distinguished Alumni nominations sought from campus members; deadline is Feb. 13

The campus’ Graduation Committee is seeking nominations from Chillicothe Campus participate in the annual Recognition of Graduation event and exemplify the spirit of the Chillicothe Campus.

Criteria include:

•    Service to the OU-C Campus:  Leadership roles on university committees/boards or significant contributions to the university’s future, or brings national prominence to the campus.
•    Philanthropic support at OU-C:  Leverage for campus advancement initiatives.  Record exists of contribution and support for the campus.
•    Recognition in the field:  Regional, local or state awards, international awards for publications, research, or leadership.
•    Service to the community:  Record of service results in significant improvement to community (local, or regional/state/national).
•    Overall contributions:  The nominee embodies the highest caliber of excellence in his/her field and commitment to the campus and/or university.

Nominations are due by Feb. 13. To nominate an individual, contact Joyce Atwood for a nomination form: atwoodj@ohio.edu.

Chillicothe Campus students describe traits of their favorite faculty members

 We regularly talk with Chillicothe Campus students to get their take on the campus experience. We recently asked students to describe the traits of a truly cool faculty member.

Colin Echard, an anatomy major from Zane Trace High School, cited an example. “Dr. Hammoudi is the man. He is incredibly passionate about his job and very thorough about his explanations.”

Professor Hammoudi’s popularity is growing. “A good faculty member is extremely good at explaining things that do not make sense. As with Dr. Hammoudi, he is super good to everyone. Another trait of any cool faculty members is that they are willing to talk with students during their office hours,” said Kat Landrum, a post-secondary option student who attends Jackson High School.

“Tony Vinci is a faculty member I really like,’ said Mackenzie Brodess, a pre-dentistry student from Zane Trace High. “He is energetic and makes a good learning environment. He encourages students to express themselves.”



  “Mike Lafreniere is really interested in his students and wants them to succeed,” said Mackenzie Boyer, a Chillicothe High graduate who is undeclared in terms of her academic major. “Also, I really like Debra Nickles. She really wants her students to learn and gives good feedback.”

Nicholas Kennedy, an environmental engineering technology student from Chillicothe High, said, “I like all of my EVT professors. Jamie Mash is especially good. He explains careers we can go into, and they are all very motivated.”