Tuesday, January 12, 2016

‘Hope Trunk,’ which memorializes Oklahoma City bombing, will be on display at OU-C library


The “Hope Trunk,” which contains educational materials and memorial items from the April 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, will be on display in the Quinn Library at Ohio University-Chillicothe for approximately two weeks beginning around Jan. 19. The library is located in the Stevenson Center, and the exhibit is free and open to the public.

The traveling exhibit, which is on loan from the Oklahoma City Memorial Museum, will also be utilized in the “Terrorism and Homeland Security” class that is part of the campus’ Law Enforcement Technology program.

The trunk includes artifacts from the museum’s archives and has been developed to emphasize the impact of violence and its senselessness as well as the importance of personal responsibility.

The trunk has been on exhibit at schools nationwide. Many students viewing its artifacts were not alive when the Oklahoma City bombing occurred, and the exhibit helps to ensure the messages of that event continue to have impact.

“I lived in Oklahoma for nine years and included the trunk in a class I taught at Oklahoma State University,” said Brenda Phillips, associate dean who teaches the Terrorism and Homeland Security class. “I have found that college students find this especially meaningful. It helps them to broaden their horizons in terms of their understanding of terrorism and that it is a broader concept than they usually think as they consider its roots and impact on individuals.”

“The exhibit is very powerful and brings home for the students its effects as they realize the personal stories of those who were killed and lost loved ones. From my past experiences, the exhibit includes a range of items such as children’s books; DVDs and videos of both the explosion and its aftermath; police department and fire department patches from across the nation as a s ow of unity; and rubble from the site. Also, each trunk includes a ‘hope bear’ that was placed at the memorial. In fact, Ohio University-Chillicothe will be the first ‘hope school’ in Ohio.”

More information about the exhibit is available online at https://oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org/learn/education/hope-trunk/

3 comments:

Kathryn Rapp said...

I had a wonderful opportunity to visit the Hope Trunk and explore all of the amazing artifacts yesterday. I am a junior in the Early Childhood program, as I feel as if this is a GREAT resource to know of as a future teacher! Thank you so much for this wonderful opportunity!

Emily Schmidt said...

My name is Emily Schmidt and I am an Early Childhood Education major here at OUC. My class, EDEC 4500, had the privilege of getting a one on one experience with the hope chest yesterday during our weekly class meeting. Brenda Phillips gave us a personal look through the articles found in the hope chest and gave us some great information and resources as future educators. I really enjoyed this experience and feel that I have learned a lot from this class meeting. One of the games included in the Hope Trunk was a character building game. One of the cards in the game had the words "Lifelong Learner" on it. These words are part of our motto and are words that we as future educators should strive for. It is called, "CALLED TO LEAD" and each letter stands for something. The two L's in the motto stand for Lifelong Learners. It was really great to see that as a good character card and really showed me how everything ties in together. I had a great experience with this and have actually purchased several of the teacher tools on Amazon because I thought they were so great and would be great to have in my classroom!

Ashleigh Morgan said...

I had the pleasure of viewing the Hope Trunk as part of a presentation given by Dr. Phillips. As a teacher candidate I was thoroughly impressed with the mission and vision of the Hope Trunk. It's a very unique way to provide comfort to children who have experienced this kind of trauma be it directly or indirectly. You never know who is going to walk into your classroom and the Hope Trunk is a great way to be prepared.