Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Chillicothe Campus faculty members present on education program’s beneficial partnerships



By public relations student writer Madison Corbin

Ohio University Chillicothe faculty, partnership directors and coordinators recently presented at the National Association of Professional Development Schools (NAPDS) in Washington, D.C. The presentation, entitled “Preparing Future Teachers: Partnerships Benefitting Special Rights’ P-5 Students,” pertained to OU-C’s Early and Middle Childhood Education programs’ work with two educational organizations in surrounding communities.

OU-C collaborates with the Unioto Unified School District’s SCOPES Academy for gifted and talented students as well as the Ross County Educational Service Center’s Prekindergarten Early Childhood Intervention Program for developmentally delayed and typically developing children. The SCOPES Academy incorporates a curriculum based on STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Medical) while the Ross County ESC incorporates a curriculum based on the Ohio Department of Education’s academic content standards and individualized education plans for special needs children.

The OU-C Early and Middle Childhood Education program coordinators aim to equip their students for meaningful and effective work in a variety of educational scenarios. Involvement in these two diverse scholastic settings provides teachers-in-training the experiences and understandings required to successfully accommodate learning styles of students at all levels. “As a result, OU-C graduates are better prepared to address the gifts and challenges of all children,” said Barbara Trube, professor of education and coordinator of early childhood education at OU-C.

“This partnership has allowed our program to acquire new ideas for meeting the needs of our students and shaping exceptional teacher candidates,” said Leslie Smith, prekindergarten programs coordinator at Ross County Educational Service District. “The trip to D.C. helped showcase our program and gain professional development to share with our staff.”

“We have great ideas to take back to our classrooms,” added Kit Kinnamon adjunct faculty and pre-primary professional internship supervisor at OU-C. “It’s been very educational.”

At the SCOPES Academy, early and middle childhood education majors are supervised in field placements, as they engage with gifted children in an authentic and student-led environment.
“The SCOPES program is such an incredible hands-on learning experience,” said Bree Wachovec, an Early Childhood Education student.

At the Ross County ESC, early and middle childhood education majors are paired with mentor teachers who hold early childhood intervention specialist licensure to engage in a range of co-teaching strategies.

“We are so proud of these two partnerships because they give our teacher candidates an opportunity to work with students of diverse learning needs as well as talented mentor teachers,” said Karen Corcoran lecturer and middle childhood education coordinator at OU-C. 

Academic professionals from each organization addressed teamed up to discuss the operations and effects of partnership. Presenters included Trube; Karen Corcoran, lecturer and middle childhood education coordinator at OU-C; Jennifer Domo, adjunct faculty and director of SCOPES Academy at Unioto Unified School District; Leslie Smith, prekindergarten programs coordinator at Ross County Educational Service District; and Kit Kinnamon, adjunct faculty and pre-primary professional internship supervisor at OU-C. Loretta Harvey, Shawnee State University faculty and Grant Coordinator at Battelle for Kids also attended.

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