Thursday, January 12, 2017

Chancellor John Carey visits OUC to discuss impact of College Credit Plus program


Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor John Carey visited the Ohio University Chillicothe Campus Wednesday to discuss the regional impact of the College Credit Plus program.

CC+, an Ohio Department of Higher Education initiative, allows students in grades as early as seven and through their senior year, to take college credit courses free of charge. Students can complete the college level class to earn dual credit for high school graduation and college simultaneously.

Campus Dean Dr. Martin Tuck and Chancellor Carey highlighted the program’s success during an interview with local radio station WKKJ’s Dan Ramey prior to showcasing the Chillicothe campus to the ODHE’s top official.

Both Carey and Tuck discussed the importance of access to quality higher education throughout the South-Central Ohio region which is provided through CC+.

“The College Credit Plus program has been instrumental in helping those in Chillicothe and surrounding communities gain an advantage when it comes to a college education,” said Tuck. “With more than 160 students having participated in the program at OUC this past semester alone, it’s opened doors for area students and the campus. We are delighted to be a part of this successful state initiative.”

Carey met with OUC students who are actively enrolled in CC+ to gain a better understanding of its bearing on student achievement and garner valuable feedback from program participants.  

Olivia Henness, a Unioto High School graduate and student at OUC studying early childhood education, spoke about her experience in CC+ and how it helped her prepare for college, save money and ultimately be a better student.

“I thought it was great that he wanted to meet with students who have participated or are participating in College Credit Plus in order to get their feedback on the program to better improve it,” Henness noted.  “I did College Credit Plus in high school and it allowed me to get ahead in my degree and I am now going to graduate a semester early, saving me a lot of money. From my experience, I would definitely encourage students to take advantage of this opportunity.”

Students were also able to offer ideas on how the program could be improved in the future which included ideas such as expanding in-school course offerings at the high schools.

“It would be nice to have more course offerings in local schools to help with the costs of driving back and forth to a college,” said Henness. “It would also give more students the opportunity to attend the courses, which is a great outcome.”  

In September of 2016, the ODHE released their report on the first year’s findings for CC+, estimating that more than 52,00 students enrolled in the program saving more than $110 million in tuition for Ohio families. It is expected that the state will see an increase in student enrollment as more Ohioans take advantage of the chance to attain college and high school dual credit through the program.

For more information on College Credit Plus, visit www.ohiohighered.org or www.ohio.edu/dualenrollment.

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